Doubt

The best thing that can happen to you is doubt
Doubt takes you beyond knowing

Doubt takes you beyond the absolute
Doubt takes you into disidentification

Doubt takes you into: “I don’t know”
Doubt takes you into Space
Doubt takes you into Love
Doubt takes you into You …

Where doubt arises,
Love can grow

Where there is doubt,
You are …

Yes and/or No

When we listen to conversations
When we listen to ourselves

When somebody tells us something
and we react and disagree

When someone asks us a question
and we defend ourselves

There is so much ‘No’ …

‘No’ feeds resistance,
‘No’ feeds the mind
‘No’ separates us from our soul
‘No’ separates us from ourselves

Living is the art to say
‘Yes’ all the time to our soul
To acknowledge the voice within
To see where the other person is right
To digg deep within
To sit with our irritation
And not act out

Living is the art
to act in …

Words

Every word we use, we were taught
Every meaning of a word we use, we were taught

Every word is the verbalization of an impuls, a sensation we feel in the body
Every verbalization is an attempt to put into words what can not be put into words

Every feeling that is put into words
Every thought that is put into words
Every memory, association, perception that is put into words
Is an attempt to point at something which is beyond words

What is love
What is tenderness
What is compassion

Maybe we can not express what something is
Maybe we can only be what we are …

The Peace that lies in Dying

The embrace that lies in these words, touched the deepest essence of Who I Am in me. I share this with you in deep respect and love. Wonderwandeling/Wonderwalk

Eckhart Tolle on Death & Dying

Q: How does one be with the process of death in such a way that it can be celebrated?

ET:  Death is a great opportunity because death is one way in which the formless dimension comes into this life.  It’s precisely at the moment of the fading of the form, that the formless comes into this life.  But if that is not accepted, and the fading of form is denied, then it’s a missed opportunity.

As people around you pass away, you become increasingly aware of your own mortality.  The body will dissolve.  Many people still, in our civilization, they deny death.  They don’t want to think about it, don’t want to give it any attention.

There is enormous potential there for spiritual flowering.  Even in people who, up to the point of the beginning of the fading of the form, were completely identified with the form.  It’s your last chance in this incarnation, as your body begins to fade – or you are becoming aware of this limited lifespan.  It’s your last chance to go beyond identification with form.  This is true whether it’s to do with your body, or somebody else’s body.

In the proximity of death, there is always that grace hiding underneath the seemingly negative event.  Death in our civilization is seen as entirely negative, as if it shouldn’t be happening.  Because it’s denied, people are so shocked when somebody dies – as if it’s not possible.  We don’t live with the familiarity of death, as some more ancient cultures still do.  The familiarity of death isn’t there.  Everything is hidden, the dead body is hidden.  In India you can see the dead bodies being carried through the streets, and being burned in public.   To the Westerners, it’s terrible.

As the consciousness is changing, I feel that more and more death will become an important part of the evolutionary process, the process of the arising consciousness on our planet.

At any age, the form can dissolve.  Even if you are very young, you may encounter death close to you.  At any age, it is extremely helpful to become familiar with, or comfortable with, the impermanence of the physical form.

I recommend to everybody, to occasionally visit the cemetery.  If it’s a nice cemetery, that makes it more pleasant.  Some cemeteries are like beautiful parks, you can walk around and feel extremely peaceful.  But even if it’s not nice, spiritually it is just as helpful to walk around the cemetery and contemplate the fact of death.  I still do that, quite often, whenever I have a chance.

In Europe, in the villages and so on, you have a cemetery next to the church very often.  I love walking around there.  My favorite thing is reading the names on the gravestones.  Sometimes if the gravestones are very old, you’ll see that the name is not there anymore – it got eroded by the weather.

It’s the contemplation of death and the acceptance of the impermanent nature of the human form that opens up, if you accept it.  Don’t intellectualize it.  Don’t come to some kind of conclusion about it.  Just stay with the simple “isness” of the fact of the impermanence of the human form, and accept that for what it is without going any further.  If you go further, you get into comforting beliefs, that’s very nice too.  But what I am driving at is something deeper than comforting beliefs – instead of going to some kind of conclusion, stay with the fact of the impermanence of the human form, and contemplate this fact.

With the contemplation of the impermanence of the human form, something very deep and peaceful opens up inside you.  That is why I enjoy going to cemeteries.  When you accept the impermanence, out of that comes an opening within, which is beyond form.  That which is not touched by death, the formless, comes forward as you completely accept the impermanence of all forms.  That’s why it is so deeply peaceful to contemplate death.

If someone close to you dies, then there is an added dimension.  You may find there is deep sadness.  The form also was precious, although what you loved in the form was the formless.  And yet, you weep because of the fading form.  There too, you come to an acceptance – especially if you are already familiar with death, you already know that everything dies – then you can accept it more easily when it happens to somebody close to you.  There is still deep sadness, but then you can have the two dimensions simultaneously – the outer you weeps, the inner and most essential is deeply at peace.  It comes forward almost as if it were saying “there is no death”.  It’s peace.

Peoplewhisperer

“What we do is to snap the brain out of it”: that is a frequent used quote by Cesar Millan, the dogwhisperer.

I sat with that quote for somehow I felt there was something so deep and true in it. “We snap the brain out of it, before it escalates; before it goes to the red zone”. The red zone is most of the time the state in which the dog attacks and can not be controled any longer.

I began translating this quote to what I do with people, when they come to me for help. In most cases the people who come to me, want help with the on going thoughtstream in their head. They feel stressed and often they suffer from burnout symptoms.

What could be the case is this.
The brain receives impulses and produces thoughts and the mind, as identified consciousness, attaches to those thoughts and takes them for real. When the mind  is stopped in that identifying process by being confronted it with the reality of the moment, the “mind is snapped out of it”. The mind has this identifying habit and is conditioned to do so for thousands of years. It is not personal. It comes with the human species. So when we confront the mind with itself and when we hold up the mirror so the mind can see itself, then it is possible that the mind stops and “is snapped out of it”.

Finding the absolute truth in ourselves by asking ourselves if it is true what we believe and waiting for the heart, intuition, cosmic intelligence, or whatever, to answer from the depth of our being, stops the identifying process. And when we do that often enough, the mind will gradually get used to the conditioning of investigating thoughts , before believing thoughts.

Cesar Millan is the whisperer for dogs. We can all be the whisperer for people. Holding up the mirror, asking if it is true, is what we can do. It takes time to get used to this new way of looking at our thoughts. I think the time is right to dive in the depths that are waiting inside of us. And what I found is that that depth has no ending …

Blessing on the journey into yourself; the journey without end and without distance …

Place

Show me the place
where words are still
and thoughts are gone

Show me the place
where tears may fall
and arms will hold

Show me the place
where stillness grows
and silence speaks

Show me the place
where you are home
and never leave …

Expectation

When we decide
what our destination is
could we be wrong?
Who is deciding?
What is a destination?

When we stop and feel
what the inner guide tells us
about a direction we can take,

Can we then feel the aliveness,
the unexpectednesss, the unknown,
the adventure, the spontaneity,
the openess, the playfulness?

Expectation of an outcome
is wanting the outcome to happen.

To take one step
in a direction
makes that step
the most important thing
there is
in our life

And then we feel
that the journey of life
is just
one
step …

What if God is one of us?

What if God is the good guy,
the bad guy, the stone, the dog?

What if God is what you like,
don’t like, project unto others?

What if God is what you see, hear,
smell, sense, feel and taste?

What if God is the earth, the sun,
the moon, the universe and beyond?

What if God is everything that comes,
woven in the fabric of your destiny?

What if God is you and me,
and all the others?

What if God is everything
including me, and everything in me?

Be still and Know I Am God …

Listen

When there is no “I” who listens
there is no “I” who reacts
Then there is only: listening

What a precious enormous gift
to the other
to yourself

Deep listening is the kind of listening that can help relieve the suffering of another person. You can call it compassionate listening. You listen with only one purpose: to help him or her to empty his heart. Even if he says things that are full of wrong perceptions, full of bitterness, you are still capable of continuing to listen with compassion. Because you know that listening like that, you give that person a chance to suffer less. If you want to help him to correct his perception, you wait for another time. For now, you don’t interrupt. You don’t argue. If you do, he loses his chance. You just listen with compassion and help him to suffer less. One hour like that can bring transformation and healing.

~Thich Nhat Hanh